Palliative care is given to those patients who are suffering from a life threatening condition. It aims to help them cope better with the various side effects and symptoms associated with a particular condition as well as its treatment. This type of care can be offered at the time the condition is diagnosed, during treatment, after treatment and during follow-up care, as well as during the last stages of life. It almost always involves the family members of the patient, to make it a smooth and more emotionally manageable process for everyone involved.

Palliative care aims to provide psychological, emotional and spiritual support to patients and families to help deal with the last stages of life.

It also aims to reduce the pain and discomfort that a patient goes through during the last stages of life.

When do you need Palliative Care?

The team that works in palliative care is mainly trained to work with patients who suffer from or are going through treatment for any form of life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, any disease of the kidney, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, congestive heart failure (CHF), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and others.

Palliative care is given by a team of doctors who are specially trained for the same, along with nurses, physiotherapists and others who are specially trained to for this particular type of care. At Care24, we have experienced and trained staff who work exclusively in palliative care, to make the caring process easier and more enriching for your loved one, as well as more reliable for the entire family.

The staff is also trained to work together with any other doctors that your loved one may require, and provide additional support and care.

How Can A Home Caregiver Help With Palliative Care


  • Manage the pain and discomfort better on a day to day basis

  • Take care of depression and anxiety

  • Help with fatigue

  • Help in easing sleep problems

  • Take care of constipation or other digestive issues

  • Help to manage nausea or loss of appetite

  • Provide constant and positive companionship

  • Keep your loved one aware of what is going on and how the treatment is helping

  • Make your loved one aware of the various treatment choices and why a certain type of treatment is needed

  • Will understand your loved one’s concerns and questions and cater to them

  • Will keep all doctors and others on the team aware and up-to-date with your loved one’s daily health
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    Manage the pain and discomfort better on a day to day basis

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    Take care of depression

  • Connector.Connector.

    Help with fatigue

  • Connector.Connector.

    Helping in easing sleep problems

  • Connector.Connector.

    Take care of constipation or other digestive issues

  • Connector.Connector.

    Help to manage nausea or loss of appetite

  • Connector.Connector.

    Provide constant and positive companionship

  • Connector.Connector.

    Keep your loved one aware of what is going on and how the treatment is helping

  • Connector.Connector.

    Make your loved one aware of the various treatment choices and why a certain type of treatment is needed

  • Connector.Connector.

    Will understand your loved one’s concern, questions and cater to them

  • Connector.Connector.

    Will keep all doctors and others on the team aware and up-to-date with your loved one’s daily health

Physiotherapy can greatly improve your loved one’s quality of life, even in the later stages. Here are a few ways in which physiotherapy can help in palliative care:

Walking is one of the easiest exercises that our therapists can first assist your loved one with. It will help the therapist understand the amount of help your loved one requires with mobility. It will help to reduce any stiffness as well as help to relax tight muscles.

Walking will also improve overall posture and help to reduce and prevent back pain especially if your loved one spends a lot of time in bed. It is also a good way to improve the digestive system and prevent constipation, which can often be common in those who are in bed for long hours each day.

The physiotherapist can also help with various exercises that your loved one can perform in bed, when walking is not an option. These will help to manage and reduce overall pain, discomfort and stiffness. It is also important in preventing the risk of bed sores. Regular bed exercises will prevent muscle degeneration and also help to prevent depression and anxiety in your loved one. It also helps to maintain basic motor and coordination skills.